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 “In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WIRE Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also like the number. 

In today’s episode we are speaking with Tatiana Falcão, an international tax lawyer and avid supporter of carbon tax regimes.

 “In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WIRE Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also like the number . 

In today’s episode we are speaking with Leyre Marzo, chemist and expert in photocatalysis.

“In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also like the number😉.

In our today’s episode we are speaking with Dr Madalina Stefan, Film, Literature and Cultural Studies Scholar, compulsive reader, highly addicted to theory and movie junkie, passionate about publishing on Accented Cinema and deeply in love with nature narratives.

The WIRE – Women in Research Fellowship 2020 has started. Eight amazing Post-Docs are being part of this round’s programme.

Ever wondered how science fights bush fires from above the sky? Why gods of Palmyra might still be relevant today? Did you know that there are certain molecules that can harvest energy from the sun and can be used to translate it into chemical energy? Did you know that there is a protein called SPOCK1, which seems to be responsible for a very aggressive form of ovarian cancer and can probably be utilized as a cancer marker? Have you ever heard of „nature narratives“ and why it is well worth diving into?

In the series “33 Questions for” we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also like the number😉.

In our final episode we are speaking with Angélique, neurobiologist and passionate lover of drosophila flies, „confocals“, scalpels, the beauty of nature – even in such creatures as flies – and of course her current research on the so-called circadian clock. Have a look for yourself and check out our short documentary about „The Lady of the Flies“ Angélique:

When we introduced our Fellows in our little riddle, we also raised the question „why“. It was meant in a double sense: Why did you choose your field? And why do your think your research matters? Well, our mircobiologist Maria Laura has already given an insight into the first „why“ question in our feature 33 questions. But we wanted to give her some more space to share her thoughts about the second „why“ question – which is, we think, very important in a world where the relevance of research and science for society’s flourishing sometimes is doubted … So let’s take a look at Maria Laura’s thoughts:

Can Bacteria Help us Get Rid of Microplastics?

My research will directly increase the knowledge we have around a relatively new topic in science: microplastics. In particular, I will try to answer a specific question: Do the surface properties that enhance bacterial attachment to chitin also enhance attachment to ordinary plastics surface and, if they do, is there a preference for a specific kind of material?

If you never heard of microplastics or chitin, you might be thinking: Why microplastics and chitin? What are microplastics? Why is it relevant to understand how bacteria attach to these compounds?

“Time present and time past are both perhaps present in time future and time future contained in time past.”

T. S. Eliot

Coming back home…

In my previous posts, I’ve shared with you a travel story, a story about two friends, Alex and I, who left the (relative) comfort of a couch on a sweaty summer night to explore the refreshing land of historiography and get to know the historians who inhabit it.

On our journey of thought we have learned that historiography is the history of history: It studies how the work of historians changes throughout the centuries. But to what purpose? Well, in our imaginary journey we explored the idea that the work of historians is most useful to mankind when it’s not focused on giving answers, but rather questioning the past, the present, the future …

Now we were ready to return home. Our fantasy journey was coming to an end. But the very thought of going back home stirred us to move forward with our conversation. In fact, one step was still missing to complete our itinerary. We knew what home was for us: London, the torrid and lazy summer, and the Mexican takeaway down the street luring us in with the promise of excellent guac and salsa to accompany our drinks. But we still needed to answer a key, basic question. What was home for a historian? We resumed our walk pondering this question and talking it over until we finally reached home.

In our series „33 questions“ we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also like the number😉.

In our first episode we are speaking with Maria Laura, a passionate microbiologist dedicated to fight environmental pollution.