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Last weekend was once again the Day of Peace of Westphalia. We are taking this as an opportunity to present an exciting programme currently in the works: the Münster International Peace Research Initiative (MIPRI). Similar to WiRe, MIPRI aims to promote and bring together international junior researchers. But let’s return briefly to the Day of Peace of Westphalia. What does the day commemorate again?

This entry to the blog was written by Dr. Yamina Saheb, climate mitigation scientist and current WiRe Fellow whose work and research focuses on designing sustainable policies to ensure wellbeing for all within planetary boundaries.

This blogpost is a slightly altered version of the sufficiency section included in the report entitled 1.5-Degree Lifestyles: Towards a Fair Consumption Space for All published by Hot or Cool Institute. Dr. Saheb’s contribution to this report introduces and examines sufficiency practices, which are long-term actions and societal changes driven by non-technological solutions. Sufficiency (in contrast to the want-based efficiency approach to climate policy) focuses on human needs and services required for wellbeing (i.e., housing including thermal comfort, nutrition, mobility…).

Global warming is today’s reality in every region of the planet

Heatwaves, heavy precipitation, agricultural and ecological droughts in some regions, tropical cyclones, as well as reductions in Arctic Sea ice, snow cover and permafrost are unfortunately what 2021 will be remembered for. Changes of the global climate system became indisputable. Extreme weather and climate events driven by human-induced warming of the atmosphere, ocean and land is unequivocal (Masson-Delmotte 2021).  Every region across the planet has experienced in 2021 at least one climate and weather extreme event. The global climate system has changed because of the global warming caused by the continuous increase of greenhouse gas emissions driven by human activities. Carbon dioxide emissions, resulting from the use of fossil fuels, is the main greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. Over the period 1750-2019, global carbon dioxide concentration increased by 48% to 410 ppm (parts per million) (Global Carbon Budget 2021) leading to an increase of global surface temperature of 1.09°C compared to the pre-industrial temperature levels (Masson-Delmotte 2021).

Endometriosis is a common condition where the lining of the uterus grows in other locations, such as the ovaries and the intestines. This disease is extremely painful and often associated with infertility. Despite the high prevalence of the disease (an estimated 10% of women deal with endometriosis during their reproductive years), this condition remains challenging to diagnose and treat. As a result, most treatments for the endometriosis are not curative and have a high number of associated side-effects. Unfortunately, very little is known about the disease at the molecular level, partially due to the lack of suitable experimental models needed to study the disease.

This is where research in bioengineering plays a roll. To provide some insight into this field, we checked in with one of our 2018/2019 WiRe fellows, Dr. Anna Stejskalová, whose research at the University of Münster focused on designing a 3D model of early endometrial lesions.

Call for Applications: WiRe Fellowships for Female Post-Doc Scientists – Apply Now! Remote and on-site options available.

WiRe is a fellowship programme for international female postdoctoral researchers at the University of Münster (WWU) in Germany. Hosted by the WWU’s Welcome Centre, the WiRe programme was founded to help address the unique needs of women in research, with a special focus on female Postdocs who currently find themselves in their ‚Rush Hour of Life‘.

For more information regarding the Application Details, please visit http://go.wwu.de/wire. Applicants must be currently residing in the European Union/EFTA States/UK. The application period is open until the 15th of October, 2021.

For insight into what our Female Scientists have worked on so far during their WIRE Fellowships, please dive into our blog at www.wire-wwu.de/

In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And we also like the number😉.

In today’s episode we are speaking with Louisa, artist-publisher/researcher and passionate lover of publishing and self-publishing within and across visual arts and literature.

Author: Dr. Giulia Marotta

This is the second blogpost in a series from Giulia, one of our first-ever WiRe fellows whose research focuses, among other things, on the contemporary history of Catholicism in Europe. We are thrilled to have her back as a guest on the blog, this time introducing by way of creative writing her newest research project on the conceptual history of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Giulia would like to thank the WWU for funding the preparatory stages of the project through the Post-doc Program and Erasmus+, and Professor Dr. Olaf Blaschke, apl. Professor Dr. Klaus Große Kracht, and Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. Hubert Wolf for their invaluable input and support. The story, all names, and characters portrayed in this blogpost are fictitious.

In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And also, we just like the number 😉.

In today’s episode we are speaking with Julija, theologian and passionate lover of Christian anthropology.

Author: Dr. Giulia Marotta

This blogpost comes to us from one of our first WiRe fellows, Giulia, who came to Münster in 2018 to develop a project on Catholic female historiography. Now, almost 3 years later, she reflects fondly on her time in the city and at the WWU: „Both the city and the university life were very inspiring for my research, and the WiRe staff went out of their way to make me feel welcome and create the best possible environment to achieve my professional goals. They did it so well that I decided to come back to the University of Münster in 2020 as a post-doc 😉 And of course, I couldn’t help getting involved in the WiRe community again“. 

And we are so happy that she is back as a contributor to the blog! Giulia tells us, „With this series I would like to offer readers of every level and background a non-intimidating and easy-to-follow resource to sneak a peek into my new research project, which deals with the conceptual history of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The story, all names, and characters portrayed in this blogpost are fictitious. I wholeheartedly thank the WWU for funding the preparatory stages of the project through the Post-doc Program and Erasmus+, and Professor Dr. Olaf Blaschke, apl. Professor Dr. Klaus Große Kracht, and Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. Hubert Wolf for their invaluable input and support. And a huge THANKS to the WiRe Programme for hosting me on their wonderful Blog :-)“

With that, please enjoy this first instalment of a three-part series, guiding us by way of creative writing through a historical past.

In the series “33 questions” we introduce, in no particular order, our WiRe Fellows who are currently working on a research project here at the University of Münster. Why 33? Well, if we think of the rush hour of life, it is kind of the age that lies in its middle. And also, we just like the number😉.

In today’s episode we are speaking with Julietta Steinhauer, historian and passionate researcher of ’normal people‘ in ancient times.